DIY Doll House Floor

pinkmarblefloorA

You can easily make this pink and white marble floor for your doll photography or for a dollhouse floor.  I’ve pick a pattern I saw in a magazine, but you can google marble floors and find ultra fabulous patterns that can make you crazy looking at them.  They’re not that hard to figure out and since there are no rules…..you can’t go far wrong.

Start with your materials.  I’ve chosen a large piece of pink poster board which will serve as the base for the tiles and will show through as my “grout”.  Honestly, it’s a pink grout floor, but that didn’t have the zing that “pink marble floor” has, and I was going for subtle pink.  Also shown below (click on any photo to enlarge), are a couple of pieces of white poster board and some darker pink wall paper which will be used as accent tiles for this floor.  Some of the white poster board has already been cut into small rectangles which will be my white slate/marble tiles.

Pinkandwhitefloor1

I started by drawing a very very very light pencil line on a diagonal across the pink board as a guide line to get started.  All you have to do is start placing the white marble tiles on the pink board with a touch of glue.  You don’t have to be perfect.  I only made the one guideline and eyeballed it from there, but do whatever you have to do to keep things in line and fairly square.

Pinkmarblefloor2

Keep adding more of the white tiles.  Below, you can also see that I’ve cut up the piece of wallpaper into small accent tiles.  You will have to figure out the scale of your floor to suit your needs at the start of the project.  I wanted pink “grout” to also show around the little accent tiles, so they were cut with that in mind.  Paste them in just like the big tiles.

PinkMarblefloor3

Here’s a close look at the finished product and then a photo of the whole scene.  You might notice that the accent tiles are made from the same wallpaper as the wall.  These kinds of touches are fun to make and can add so much visual appeal to your doll photography or dollhouse.  The garden door in the last photo is fun to make and you can learn how here.   Hope you like it.  Thanks for looking.  Ask questions if you have any.  Best Wishes, Melanie

Pinkmarblefloor4

pinkmarblefloorB

Advertisements

Doll Accessories, My Garden Door View

Gardendoor7

Dolls can only look at walls for so long before they go bonkers.  Yes, they like art & books, but a great view is a lovely thing.  Creating a door or window will add a lot of depth and ambiance to your doll photography.  It also just makes it more fun to appreciate them when you see them in a space as lovely as they are.

Making a door or window with a view is easy.  I’ve used wood in this case….because I can.  I’m a tool girl and playing with my bandsaw is just too much fun to pass up, but you can simply substitute poster board or foam board.

First I decided on the scale, which in this case is 1/3 so it will go with my bookcase.  The first photo below (click on any photo to enlarge) shows my pattern, which was cut from heavy paper.  You can see that I’ve planned for the door and the surrounding moulding.

Gardendoor1

Next, I mark the pattern onto my wood.  Even if you’re doing a version using poster board or foam board, play it safe and make a pattern first.  It might save you a trip to the store to purchase more materials when you realize you’d really like it a bit bigger or smaller or wider or whatever.

Gardendoor2

Here’s my finished cuts ready for spray paint.  Just in case you’re wondering, I cut my trim parts in two pieces because it’s less wasteful of my wood.  If you’re doing the poster board version you can do it in one nice sweeping arch.  Of course you can make a rectangular garden door also, but I just love the elegance of an arch.

Gardendoor3

This next photo shows the painted door and trim in off-white satin finish spray paint.  The beauty of using poster board is that you can simply pick the color you want and skip the painting step.  We’re looking at the back side of the door and you can see my staples holding everything in place.  You’re also looking at the back side of the photo of my garden, which was enlarged in photoshop (in sections) and taped together to get it that large.  Remember I mentioned that this is 1/3 scale (SD or 24″ size dolls), so the total height of the door is 27 inches.  The photo is 22″ tall, which is just enough to cover the needed area.  I simply taped the photo to the door from the back side and when you turn it over, voila!, you have a fabulous view.

Gardendoor5

The last part is putting the hardware on to give it authenticity.  What you’re seeing below is a piece of green poster board which I used to hold my door hardware before I spray painted it with an old can of gold paint in a hammered metal look.  Love using up old cans of paint.  You can see four little pieces of wood that will make my door hinges.  They are  little wooden skewers bought at the grocery store and cut into one inch pieces.  You know, the kind you put veggies or meat on so they don’t fall through the grill as you BB-Que them.  Place them on a piece of masking tape, with the sticky side up.  This holds them in place while sprayed them.  Otherwise they’d have flow off from the power of the spray can.  The two brown circle looking items are the door knobs, which are large decorative nails I use in my upholstery business.  They worked fantastic, but you could just cut circles and add several small layers of poster board behind them to lift them off the surface and create the illusion of depth.  You could also make nice door knobs out of polymer clay. The little white paper shapes are my door knob plates, which are just poster board cut to a decorative shape and painted.  Pretty cute, huh?

Gardendoor6

Here’s one of the many photos I’ve taken of this door.  The finished product is so easy.  You can make it in any size you want.  You could take a picture of yourself (or one of your dolls) looking in the window just for fun…..or your cat peering in….or aliens.  Whatever you like.  This is my garden just outside my dining room doors and the path I laid out of local antique brick and all the plants I planted…..cause I’m a DIY girl and don’t know when to stop.  ;o}    I think the wall looks better with more contrast between the door trim and the wall, but…..

Gardendoor8

As an added bonus, here’s my latest view for my new modern furniture.  I wanted city girls to have appropriate views of their world.  It’s using the same techniques.  You can instantly create a fun space for your dolls or your stuff.  If you have smaller dolls you could set this up on the shelf of a bookcase, adding depth and interest.  See how I did the brick wall for these photos here.

PurpleModChaise2

PurpleBench5

Gardendoor10

Gardendoor9

Please feel free to ask questions and thank you for looking.  Hope you liked it.

My Pink Brick Wall Background

One of my most useful backgrounds has been the brick wall.  I generally use it to do real “product” type shots of the furniture for my Etsy shop.  There’s a great Italian restaurant a few blocks from my house on Congress Ave. in So. Austin.  It’s actually two restaurants, Vesapio and Enoteca, which operate from a joint kitchen and they’re both very good.

On the North side of the building is a vacant lot, used for parking or vendors, and it has a nice grungy brick wall.  I snapped it one morning before the vendors set up their tents and the light was just right.  I crop it to reflect the parts I want, copy it several times, and then cut and paste (literally) it together.  You can see the difference between the actual wall, the photoshopped version and the photographed version.  It’s pays to take a photo of the first copy of the one you think you might like before you do lots of copies and cut and paste.  It’s not perfect, but I like it!  Hey!, I’m a DIY kinda girl.

Brick walls as an feature in houses and lofts are quite popular.  They give a nice architectural element to the look of the place and can be found in a wide range of colors to suit your needs.  You can find brick computer wallpaper on the internet, but it’s a lot more fun to get your own from a local source.  Fun is GOOD.

My Black and White Floor

Whether a black & white floor is marble, painted wood, or linoleum,  I love um!  They work in old castles, in 50’s diners, and best of all, in doll houses and doll photography.  My version was really simple to create.  I purchased four large sheets of 1/4 inch foam board at the local craft/hobby store.  Three were white and one was black.  This is a whole bunch of foam board, but then I was doing a fairly large area.  Two of the white ones were for the base (1/4 inch plywood would also work), while the other two were for the floor itself.

The squares on my floor measure 2.5 inches.  A quick search of the web will reveal many fabulous versions of this style of floor.  Patterns and sizes vary wildly, so there’s no right or wrong way to create one.  You get to choose.  I needed a floor that would span my bookcases for my furniture photography, so I broke it into two pieces for easy storage.

Marble comes in many colors.  My pink marble floor is made from pieces of Osborne & Little wallpaper, cut up and pasted to a piece of poster board.  I like the way the floors add drama and sophistication to my furniture.

DIY Damask Wallpaper

After picking this big bold WordPress theme to show off my photography, I had to come up with a picture for the header.  I’d just done my first photo shoot with the library and was so excited.  Trying to get the dolls, the furniture, the walls, the art, and god forbid don’t forget the floor, into the shot……was just tiring.  But, once I’d created a Steampunk outfit, hat, and goggles for Angie, I decided less was more.  She looks really cute in her new outfit and I like the humor and playfulness that Steampunk can add (when you’re not fighting giant squids , of course).  There’s plenty of time to do complex shots with lots of stuff to take in………but not there……not at the top of the page…..at least not for now.  A nice vintage looking damask wallpaper would be perfect.

The wallpaper behind Angie in the header photo I made myself with a rubber stamp I’d had for a couple of years.  It’s a nice little damask pattern by A Muse Artstamps, so I thought why not play a little and see what happens.  Using a sponge and watered-down paint in browns, pinks, greens and ecru, I pressed and dragged color it all over my paper to make it look as old as possible.  Don’t worry if it gets messy, especially if you want a really old look.  The more water you use, the thicker the  grade of paper you’ll want.  Since your first effort with the stamping might not turn out exactly the way you expect, if you can, cut up the base you’ve created and photocopy it so you don’t have to repeat this step again.  Each segment can be glued together before stamping.  Using a piece of wood as a guideline I brushed more watered-down paint onto the stamp and went after it.
 

The first version was done using a color that, in hindsight, was too dark…to much the color of her hat, which was visually lost.   I wanted a really old faded look.  Here’s the photo I took to check how it looked.  Although interesting, it was just too much.

 

Trying again with a really really watered down lighter version, I got a wallpaper that would stay in the background and not compete with all the other stuff in the shot.  Be sure to mix enough of the color you want to work with so you don’t run out midway through and have to remix.  Or, be a smarty pants and take notes on the recipe so you can reproduce it if necessary.  As you can see, from the uncropped version, I only created enough of it to get the shot, so it was a pretty quick process.

 
AngieHeaderDamaskFlicX
Steampunk Angie in the Library

I think she’s a young Victorian woman, waiting in the library, for her beau to pick her up in his new steam powered motor car….no…no wait….she’s a young Victorian woman waiting in the library for her new steam powered motor car to be delivered by the cute salesman.     Ciao!